The Manual Wind: Breitling B55 Connective Smart Watch

first_imgThe recent release of the Apple Watch has everyone talking.  Is a smart watch necessary? Is it the future of watches?  As you can imagine, the most critical comments come from watch enthusiasts.  The Apple Watch is not a watch, rather a wrist device. One thing the Apple Watch and the previously released smart watches has done is lit the bulb at other watch brands.  Linking the watch and smart phone is now a point of interest, and brands like Montblanc and Breitling have shown their own interpretations of a connected watch.  Most recent is Brielting’s addition, The Breitling B55 Connected.The B55 is a black titanium monster meant for the true aviator. At 46mm in diameter, this rugged sport timepiece bears a blue rubber strap to match the blue insignia on the dial representing its connective capabilities.  Two LCD backlit screens display a myriad of functions for aviation.  Count up/down timers, time logging for trips including take-off and landing time stamps are just two of the functions for a modern pilot in the B55.  Other functions include alarms, multiple timezones, multiple chronographs, and of course the time and date.  What makes the B55 Connective special is its link with you smart phone.Capable of storing and sharing information with a smart phone makes this timepiece a pilots personal black box. Timing information is transferred from wrist to phone creating what might be the most useful pilot timepiece to date.  Even setting itself, the watch draws information from the phone as well to increase accuracy.  Charging the watch is as simple as plugging it in via USB.The Breitling B55 Connective can be called a smart watch, but it is certainly not in the same category as the Apple watch. The Apple watch and those like it  will prove to be just another technological distraction for most.  Wearing a fine timepiece shows character, interest and taste.  The Breitling B55 is a great example of making watches smarter for purpose wearers, not simply putting another screen in your face.  At roughly $8,000, the B55 is a watch made smarter. PrepDeck Makes Meal Prep Work a Breeze A Brief History of Aviator Sunglasses and Our 5 Favorite Pairs Right Now Editors’ Recommendations Affordable Watch Hunting: 10 Best Timex Watches For Men How to Use a French Press Coffee Maker The Awake G7 Watch Makes Fishing Nets Fashionable and Sustainablelast_img read more

New UN report urges measures to ensure affordable health services for all

The World Health Organization (WHO) notes that Governments worldwide are struggling to pay for health care, which is rising as populations get older, as more people suffer chronic diseases, and as new and more expensive treatments appear. It says that in countries that depend heavily on people paying directly for services at the point of delivery, health bills push 100 million people into poverty each year.In its annual World Health Report, the agency shows how all countries, rich and poor, can adjust their health financing mechanisms so more people get the health care they need. It highlights three key areas where change can happen – raising more funds for health, raising money more fairly, and spending it more efficiently.“No one in need of health care should have to risk financial ruin as a result,” said WHO Director General Margaret Chan. “The report sets out a stepwise approach. We encourage every country to act on this and do at least one thing to improve health financing and increase health coverage over the coming year.” WHO says that in many cases, governments can allocate more money for health. In 2000, African heads of State committed to spend 15 per cent of government funds on health, a goal that three countries – Liberia, Rwanda and Tanzania – have already achieved.If the governments of the world’s 49 poorest countries each allocated 15 per cent of state spending to health, they could raise an additional $15 billion per year – almost doubling the funds available, notes the agency.Countries can also generate more money for health through more efficient tax collection, says WHO, which cited as an example Indonesia, which has boosted revenue by 10 percentage points. They can find new sources of tax revenue, such as sales taxes and currency transactions, as in the case of Ghana, which funded its national health insurance partly by increasing the value-added tax (VAT) by 2.5 per cent. A review of 22 low-income countries shows that they could between them raise $1.42 billion through a 50 per cent increase in tobacco tax. WHO also cites the role of the international community, noting that if all donors joined Norway and others that have kept their promise to allocate 0.7 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) to official development assistance, three million additional lives could be saved in lower-income countries by 2015.The report highlights the model used by countries such as Japan, Chile, Rwanda and Thailand, which have reduced dependence on direct, out-of-pocket payments and increasing prepayment – generally through insurance or taxes or a mix of the two. The funds raised are then pooled so that it is not just those who get sick that bear the financial burden.Smarter spending could also boost global health coverage anywhere between 20 and 40 per cent, the agency points out, highlighting 10 areas where greater efficiencies are possible, including the use of generic drugs wherever possible – a strategy that saved almost $2 billion in 2008.WHO is presenting its report today to a ministerial conference on health financing, held in Germany. The agency and its partners will then embark on a programme to help countries review their health financing systems and strategies, facilitate exchanges of experiences between countries, and help countries adjust financing systems so that more people get access the services they need. 22 November 2010The United Nations health agency today mapped out what countries can do, including raising more funds and spending it more efficiently, to ensure that everyone who needs health care can access it despite rising costs. read more

Several homeless following Sisters Village fire

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedFire rips through North Sophia wooden home, 4 homelessAugust 16, 2017In “latest news”10 homeless, as Jilted man sets Sophia apartments ablazeJanuary 9, 2017In “latest news”4 homeless as fire guts Princes Street homeJune 12, 2017In “latest news” All that remains after the fire was quelled A fire on Wednesday night has completely destroyed a one story wooden building leaving several persons homeless at Sisters Village, West Bank Demerara (WBD).Reports are that the fire occurred sometime after 21:00h on Wednesday when one of children was reportedly playing with a lighter and a mattress caught fire. There was reportedly no adult supervision at the time.The owner of home Wilfred Duncan said on Thursday morning that 7 persons were living at the home including some of his children and grandchildren.Duncan, a construction worker said he wasn’t able to save anything as he was not at home at the time.Eyewitnesses say the fire brigade responded promptly but sourcing water proved to be an issue.Neighbours recalled intense heat emanating from the structure.The Duncan’s eastern neighbours were also affected as they were seen removing blinds and fetching down furniture to be sun-dried. read more