Maggini String Quartet at the Hollywell Music room, 10th February 2008

first_imgThe highlight of the concert was John Ireland’s Sextet for Clarinet, Horn and String Quartet, for which the Maggini quartet were joined by clarinettist Robert Plane and hornist David Pyatt. The influence of Brahms’s clarinet quintet and horn trio shows throughout Ireland’s opus, with the rich and sonorous blending of string, wind and brass making the listener yearn for more chamber music with such instrumentation. The quartet will be recording this work for Naxos later this year, hopefully raising awareness of this composer’s fascinating early work. The Maggini String Quartet gave a solid performance of a diverse and challenging programme at the Holywell Music Room, as part of the Oxford Chamber Music Society’s 2008 concert series. The final piece on the program was Mendelssohn’s String Quartet No. 4 in E Minor, op. 44, no. 2, cited in the program as being ‘one of our literature’s greatest quartets’. Violist Martin Outram offered a strong and rich opening melody. The fiery fourth movement demonstrated the quartet’s outstanding technical skill, especially in virtuosic fast passages at the exhilarating climax.  The quartet’s encore, William Alwyn’s ‘Novelette’, brought an enjoyable afternoon to a close. The Oxford Chamber Music Society presents its next concert on 2 March with the Duke Quartet performing works by Steve Reich, Bartók and Ravel. Anyone under 23 years old can obtain a free ticket on the day through the Cavatina Chamber Music Trust upon presentation of ID. center_img The first piece, Haydn’s String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 20 No. 5, was briefly was described by the quartet’s cellist Michal Kaznowski as a ‘contrast of light and dark’. The performers enhanced the frequent trade-off of major and minor keys with rich dynamic contrasts throughout all four movements. Balance amongst the players was perhaps a little uneven at times, with the lower strings sometimes obscuring first violinist Lorraine McAslan’s mellow sound. by Aaron Mertzlast_img read more

The Peach Music Festival Announces 2018 “After Midnight” Lineup

first_imgEarlier in the year, The Peach Music Festival finalized its highly anticipated lineup for its 2018 edition, which will take place at Montage Mountain in Scranton, Pennsylvania, from July 19th through 22nd, almost a full month earlier than it has in previous years. Last month, the event confirmed their daily lineups, denoting which acts will play on which days. Now, The Peach Music Festival has announced their “After Midnight” sets, which will keep Montage Mountain rocking deep into the night.The Peach Music Fest Continues To Carry The Allman Brothers Torch With Stellar 2018 LineupAccording to the newly released “After Midnight” schedule includes Gov’t Mule‘s “Dark Side of the Mule” tribute to Pink Floyd in addition to Umphrey’s McGee, Turkuaz, Spafford, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Band of Changes (featuring Chris Harford, Joe Russo, Scott Metzger, and Dave Dreiwitz), and a Magic Beans & Friends Late Night Dance Party.While the new graphic does not note which night (or in what order) the listed bands will play their late-night sets, you can get a general idea of when each set will go down via the previously released daily lineups, which have Turkuaz scheduled to play on Thursday, July 19th; Umphrey’s McGee, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, and Magic Beans set for Friday, July 20th; and Dark Side of the Mule, Spafford, and Band of Changes slated for Saturday, July 21st.In addition to the late-night offerings, The Peach will host performances from an extensive slate of talented acts from rising favorites to longstanding legends, including Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, a regular Gov’t Mule set, two sets of Joe Russo‘s Almost Dead, Dickey Betts, The Revivalists, Oteil & Friends, two sets of Twiddle, moe. (including both a regular set and a joint performance of Waiting For Columbus with Little Feat and the Turkuaz Horns), and many more.Tickets for The Peach Music Festival are available now via the event’s website.last_img read more

“Rockin’ In The Free World:” Tedeschi Trucks Band Gets Political At Red Rocks Tour Closer [Audio/Videos]

first_imgLoad remaining images Photo: Emily Butler All good things must come to an end, and Sunday night at Red Rocks, Tedeschi Trucks Band wrapped up their now-annual Wheels of Soul Tour. With the help of the Marcus King Band and Drive-By Truckers, the Florida natives closed out their tour and two-night Red Rocks stand in spectacular fashion.Despite heavy winds and tempestuous clouds during the opening acts, the storms held off as Greenville, South Carolina’s own Marcus King Band took the stage. Over the course of a fairly short set, the 22-year-old King floored the audience with his virtuosic guitar playing and unique breed of mind-boggling, psychedelic blues rock. Reminiscent of Duane Allman, Jimi Hendrix, and even Derek Trucks himself, the young prodigy has proved himself a force to be reckoned with in the coming years.Following a gritty set from Athens, Georgia’s Drive-By Truckers, Tedeschi Trucks took the stage right around 8 p.m. The opening riff to the classic “Statesboro Blues” rippled over the crowd, and the band was off and rolling. A clean, concise rendition of the song made famous by the Allman Brothers Band was followed by “Get What You Deserve” off of the 2009 Derek Trucks Band album, Already Free. Vocalist Mike Mattison led the band through the upbeat number before settling into “All That I Need” off of 2013’s Made Up Mind. Bandleader, guitarist, and all-around female powerhouse extraordinaire, Susan Tedeschi took the reins on vocals before taking a moment after the song to pray and hope for the thousands of children currently separated from their families on our southern border. As a fitting tribute, the band dropped into “Lord Protect My Child,” a Bob Dylan tune that Susan covered on her 2005 album Hope and Desire.The group followed the beautiful tribute with their timeless song, “Bound for Glory.” Interestingly enough, Susan introduced the song as another Bob Dylan composition. Seemingly, she was referencing “This Train is Bound for Glory” off of Dylan’s 1994 release of some of his earliest recordings, “The Minnesota Tapes.” Regardless, the TTB staple featured some tight interplay between guitarist Derek Trucks and keyboardist/flautist Kofi Burbridge. Though slightly shorter in length, the jam developed beautifully between the two melody makers, before coming back full circle. Derek then led the band through a brief rendition of the Allman Brothers Band’s “Little Martha” before dropping into “Midnight in Harlem.” Susan absolutely laid it all out with her vocals, digging deep, and hardly sounding like a singer at the end of a 2-month tour. Following an energetic “Part of Me”, the band welcomed out bassist Todd Smallie for “Yield Not To Temptation”, dedicated to the late great Col. Bruce Hampton. From there, the band went into Bobby Bland’s classic rave-up, “Turn on Your Lovelight.” With a strong foundation from bassist Tim Lefebvre and jaw-dropping “backing vocals” from Mark Rivers and Alecia Chakour, the group powered through the tune before returning to their own songbook with “Laugh About It.”Keeping the energy high, the group busted out another cover, Joe Tex’s “Show Me (A Man That’s Got A Good Woman).” The song provided yet another chance for the group’s phenomenal vocalists and horn players to strut their stuff. Returning to more familiar territory, the 12-piece ensemble dove into “I Want More” from 2016’s Let Me Get By. Then, with little warning, came the opening notes that so many fans wanted to hear; the intro to “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed.” With the help of Marcus King, Tedeschi Trucks tore through the Allman Brothers Band tune with absolute ferocity. King took the lead on the first solo before bowing to Trucks for the second. Trucks led the group into a short drum solo in true Allman Brothers fashion. Drummers J.J. Johnson and Tyler Greenwell danced around each other’s rhythms, never losing sight of the music ahead, and effortlessly, the band slipped back into the end of “Elizabeth Reed,” nailing the ending and putting a hell of an exclamation point on an already incredible set.Though still early in the night, the group took a well-deserved bow and then returned for an extended encore. A perfectly-executed take on Ray Charles’ “Night Time is the Right Time” was followed by a barn-burning cover of Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.” With the help of Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley from Drive-By Truckers, Tedeschi Trucks played the classic rock anthem remarkably true to form. Hood’s vocals and Cooley’s guitar work were practical shoe-ins for Neil Young circa 1989, and Tedeschi Trucks made a bold statement that much of their music only dances around.In troubled times and times like these, the Tedeschi Trucks Band’s music amplifies the soul and the spirit of humanity. Though rarely directly political, their music is always inspiring and always progressive in nature. Last night at Red Rocks, on the final evening of their tour, they went ahead and got political. It’s hard to blame them considering the current state of our country and our country’s humanity. So, just like Neil Young did for George H.W. Bush back in 1989, Tedeschi Trucks rocked the f**k out to show our Commander in Chief that we’re not backing down.“Statesboro Blues”[Video: Rober Fontneau]“Lord Protect My Child” > “Bound For Glory”[Video: Jake Lowenstein]“Midnight In Harlem”[Video: Rober Fontneau]“Show Me” with Marcus King[Video: Rober Fontneau]“In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed”[Video: Rober Fontneau]“Night Time is the Right Time” > “Rockin’ In The Free World”Listen to the full audio below, courtesy of vwmule.While it would be picturesque to say something like the Wheels of Soul Tour “rolls on,” the band took their final bow of the summer at Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre after a magnificent Sunday night show. Tedeschi Trucks Band continues touring this fall including appearances at LOCKN’, the traveling Outlaw Music Festival, and their annual stand at the Beacon Theatre in New York, NY. For a full list of tour dates, visit the band’s website.Setlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 7/29/18Statesboro Blues, Get What You Deserve, All That I Need, Lord Protect My Child, Bound for Glory, Down in the Flood, Little Martha > Midnight in Harlem, Part of Me, Yield Not to Temptation > Turn On Your Lovelight*, Laugh About It, Show Me^, I Want More$, In Memory of Elizabeth Reed$E: Night Time is the Right Time#, Rockin’ In the Free [email protected]* Todd Smallie (bass).^ Marcus King (guitar), Deshawn D’Vibes Alexander (keys), Justin Johnson (trumpet) and Dean Mitchell (saxophone).$ Marcus King (guitar).# Deshawn D’Vibes Alexander (keys), Dean Mitchell (saxophone)[email protected] Patterson Hood (guitar, vocals), Mike Cooley (guitar)Tedeschi Trucks Band | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 7/29/18 | Photos: Emily Butlerlast_img read more

Former CEO discusses mining in developing nations

first_imgWayne E. Murdy, former CEO of Newmont Mining Corporation, one of the world’s largest producers of gold, silver and copper, spoke Tuesday in DeBartolo Hall as part of the Engineering Distinguished Leader Lecture Series. He spoke about the impact of industrialization on poverty, using Newmont’s copper mine in Indonesia as an example.Murdy briefly outlined the the scale of Newmont’s Batu Hijau mine in Indonesia and its 14-year road to commercial production to a crowd comprised of mostly engineering students and professors.He said dozens of mechanical and chemical engineers, along with computer scientists, are employed to create, “the mine of the 21st century.” When the Batu Hijau has reached the end of its operation in 2036, it will be 2.5 kilometers deep and 1 kilometer wide, Murdy said.Murdy emphasized the ability of industries, such as mining, to affect change in communities. He showed a video from a TED talk by Hans Rosling entitled “The Magic Washing Machine” to show how access to simple technology can drastically improve poor communities, and he explained how this applied to the Batu Hijau mine.“Typically, when we go in a mining sense, we are going into areas that have not seen any industrialization at all,” Murdy said. “They mostly consist of subsistence farmers or fishermen, living from day to day. This is a way to bring jobs and to bring training and impact people’s lives.”The Batu Hijau power plant benefitted its local community by providing locals with cheap electricity and reducing the local malaria rate by 24 percent. Murdy also testified to the impact of education and formal training on the locals.“Many of you have been to graduations here at Notre Dame,” Murdy said. “You know what a happy occasion that is. [The graduations from the training facilities] are as good an occasion or better to watch.”Murdy said Newmont consciously phased out the high amount of expatriates working at the mine in favor of hiring local workers. He noted that the current manager of Batu Hijau is Indonesian.Murdy warned of the ethical and environmental dilemmas that coming with building mines in third-world countries.“Working in the developing world is not for the faint of heart,” he said.Murdy noted the significant drop-off in environmental and ethical standards in developing nations. He stated that companies must decide whether they will operate by low standards or the standards of the United States. He also noted that in countries like Indonesia, corruption is ubiquitous. Newmont’s mine emphasized how its mine would not operate by corruption.“We have a policy of zero harm, zero tolerance,” Murdy said about bribery. “If you start down that path it never stops.”Murdy said only 2,000 of the 60,000 applicants received jobs, which can result in some jealousies within the community. However, he said, the relatively high wages that the mineworkers receive have a substantial impact on the community.“In the past 25 years we have seen a 21 percent decrease in the number of people living in extreme poverty,” Murdy said. “Where does that credit go? Let me tell you, it does not go to foreign aid. The change in the level of extreme poverty came from industrial activities.”Tags: development, engineering, foreign aid, International Development, leadership, Newmont Mining Corporationlast_img read more

Wendel Pleased After Ohio Is Removed From COVID-19 Travel Advisory

first_imgWNY News Now File Image.MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County’s Executive says he is pleased to hear Ohio has been removed from New York State’s COVID-19 Travel Advisory list.Wendel says because of Ohio’s proximity to Chautauqua County, tourists from the state contribute greatly to the local economy.“This is great news that Ohio has been removed from the incoming travel advisory,” said Wendel in a statement. “With Chautauqua County in the southwestern corner of New York State, our close proximity to Ohio and Pennsylvania has a direct impact on our economy.”“During our recent control room meetings, and in concert with Senator George Borrello and Assemblyman Andy Goodell, we discussed at length the impact of Ohio’s restricted state status on our region,” furthered Wendel. “I am excited to see it has now been removed from the list so we are one step closer to rebuilding our economy.” The travel advisory went into effect on June 25.New York State’s Department of Health Interim Guidance says those who travel from within one of the designated states with significant rates of transmission of COVID-19 must quarantine when they enter New York State for 14 days. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Storm record

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity ofGeorgiaAs Tropical Storm Epsilon swirled about 725 miles east of Bermuda on Nov. 30, the worst Atlantic hurricane season on record officially came to a close.Epsilon was expected to send large ocean swells crashing on the island’s shores before spinning out to sea, according to a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration advisory.The 26th named storm tops off the busiest and deadliest hurricane season on record. Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma caused extensive damage along the U.S. Gulf Coast; and coupled with Stan in Central America, the storms killed thousands.”With warm ocean temperatures persisting in the Atlantic Basin, I wouldn’t be surprised if we have a named storm or two in December,” said state climatologist David Stooksbury.As far as the record number of tropical storms, “We have to be careful here,” said Stooksbury, a professor of engineering and atmospheric sciences with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Yes, it is a record,” he said. “But our records of tropical activity, especially out in the ocean, are short.”Joel Paz, a UGA Cooperative Extension climate specialist, said early hurricane predictions varied this year. Experts expected 12 to 15 named storms and seven to nine hurricanes, with three to five major hurricanes (category 3 or higher).”If you look at the long-term average, 2005 was really higher than average,” Paz said. That average called for 10 named storms and eight hurricanes, with two major storms.For the record, 2005 has seen 26 named storms, 13 hurricanes and seven major storms. Three hit category 5.The best explanation for the active hurricane season, Stooksbury said, is a 20- to 30-year cycle in ocean temperatures and tropical activity. From 1970 to 1994, the Atlantic Basin averaged nine tropical storms, five hurricanes and 1.5 major hurricanes per year.”We entered the active phase of the cycle in 1995,” he said. “From 1995 to 2004, the Atlantic Basin averaged 13.6 tropical storms, 7.8 hurricanes and 3.8 major hurricanes per year.”When satellites were launched in the 1960s, tracking storm paths in the open oceans became more consistent. During that time, Atlantic storm activity was heading into a low period, Stooksbury said.”We’re doing a better job, because of satellites and reconnaissance planes, of counting all the storms,” he said. “We used to only count the storms when they hit us. Some of these storms historically wouldn’t have been named because they’re not tropical weather events. Other very strong storms originating over the ocean are sometimes now named.”During August and September, the atmospheric conditions were very favorable for an increase in storms. And water temperatures were well above normal.”Hurricanes are really thermal energy machines,” Stooksbury said. “There’s strong heating in the tropics through the summer, so that’s kind of where you reach the max amount of heating around that time.”But 2005’s warm air isn’t a sign of global warming.”One year doesn’t really say much on global warming,” Stooksbury said. “The increase in storms can be explained by known conditions across the Atlanta Basin. It looks like an active year. Any given year is not evidence for or against global warming.”This year, Georgia didn’t see the rain and damage that hurricanes Charley, Francis, Ivan and Jeanne brought in 2004.In early July, tornadoes from Tropical Storm Cindy tore through the Atlanta Motor Speedway in Hampton, Ga. Then rain from Hurricane Dennis flooded areas already thoroughly soaked by Cindy.In October, Tropical Storm Tammy hit northeast Florida and dumped buckets of rain on Brunswick and southeast Georgia as it moved up the coast.”Most people outside of southeast Georgia didn’t even know we had Tammy,” Stooksbury said.Nevertheless, Cindy, Dennis and Tammy helped make 2005 one of the wettest summers on record in Georgia.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Champlain College President Finney, Martha Heath, Bennington College honored by NEBHE

first_imgThe New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) honored Champlain College President David F Finney, Vermont State Rep. Martha P. Heath and the Quantum Leap program at Bennington College at its 2010 New England Higher Education Excellence Awards earlier this month.Each year, NEBHE presents Regional Excellence Awards to individuals and organizations that have shown exceptional leadership on behalf of higher education and the advancement of educational opportunity. The organization also presents State Merit Awards to honor the innovative work of organizations, institutions or individuals in each New England state. The awards were presented March 5 at The New England Higher Education Excellence Awards dinner at Boston’s Longwharf Marriott Hotel.David F. Finney, president of Champlain College received the Robert J. McKenna Award for program achievement. The award is named for the former Rhode Island state senator and Newport mayor. Under Finney’s leadership, Champlain College has committed to keeping the Vermont economy robust, establishing the Bring Your Own Business (BYOBiz) program to attract entrepreneurs in 2006 as well creating the New Americans Scholarship program to reach Vermont refugee students and the Vermont First Scholarship program to serve first-generation college-goers.Rep. Martha P. Heath, chair of the Vermont House Appropriations committee, and former University of Vermont trustee received the David C. Knapp award for trusteeship, named for the former University of Massachusetts president. As chair of the Vermont House Appropriations Committee, Heath has advocated for the value of higher education and consistently supported efforts to increase educational awareness and aspirations beyond high school.The Quantum Leap program at Bennington College, led by directors Daniel Michaelson and Susan Sgorbati, received the Vermont State Merit Award. The Quantum Leap program helps children who seem least likely to succeed—who often come from chaotic home lives, extreme poverty and traumatic histories—to return to school and discover a love for learning.NEBHE President and CEO, Michael K. Thomas commented, “President Finney and Rep. Heath are truly distinguished leaders, their work on behalf of Vermont’s students, its economy and the region is exemplary. The Quantum Leap program’s innovative approach to turning around the future of young Vermonters has become a respected model for schools across the state, and the nation. NEBHE is proud to honor these winners.”Additional information about NEBHE’s New England Higher Education Excellence Awards is available online at http://www.nebhe.org/excellence2010(link is external)Champlain College President David F. Finney, left, is joined by University of Vermont President Daniel Fogel as he receives the Robert J. McKenna Award for program achievement from New England Board of Higher Education President Michael K. Thomas at the annual New England Higher Education Excellence Awards held March 5 in Boston. (Photo courtesy of NEBHE)Champlain CollegeA private, residential college founded in 1878, Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont, has a long tradition of educating professionals for leadership roles by providing a high-quality, career-oriented education. Champlain’s distinctive educational approach embodies the notion that true learning only occurs when information and experience come together to create knowledge. Champlain was named a “Top-Up-and-Coming School” by U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges 2010. To learn more about Champlain College, www.champlain.edu(link is external).New England Board of Higher EducationNEBHE is a nonprofit, congressionally authorized agency whose mission is to promote greater educational opportunities and services for the residents of New England. NEBHE programs are principally focused on the relationship between New England higher education and regional economic development.Source: Champlain College. 3.16.2010last_img read more

Optimal Batteries Can Make Critical Difference on Battlefield

first_img“I’ve noticed that with alkaline batteries, the battery indicator isn’t as reliable,” he said. Pearson added that besides thermal weapon sights, there are many other devices where Soldiers should use lithium including sensors, lasers, and precision targeting devices. His office equips Soldiers with those items so they can “dominate the battlefield in all weather and visibility conditions.” “I’ve noticed that with alkaline batteries, the battery indicator isn’t as reliable,” he said. Cost savings is another factor favoring lithium. Alkaline batteries are typically twice as inexpensive as lithium, he said. But when compared to the much longer lifespan, lithium batteries are the better choice in the long run. By Dialogo November 19, 2014 Carter, Pearson and Salcedo encouraged Soldiers to spread the word that lithium can make a difference on the battlefield. He also explained how important it is to reduce the Soldier’s load during dismounted movement. It’s not just one-third fewer batteries, he added. Each lithium battery weighs just two-thirds that of an alkaline. Why not just require Soldiers to use lithium? Joe Pearson, Logistics Management director for Project Manager Soldier Sensors and Lasers at Program Executive Office Soldier, known as PEO Soldier, added lithium batteries have been tested and shown to work in extremes from -40 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. And the more extreme the temperature, the longer the lithium batteries will work compared to the alkaline. Master Sgt. Reiko Carter, said the Army is reminding Soldiers to review their technical manuals. If the TM recommends using lithium, make the switch. He added that PEO Soldier is seeking to educate the force on optimal battery solutions, not make it a requirement. Lithium advantages Besides the charge indicator, there are several other good reasons to choose lithium batteries over alkaline. WASHINGTON – Something as seemingly insignificant as a battery could change a battlefield outcome. Staff Sgt. José R. Salcedo III learned this one night in Afghanistan. It was 2012, and Salcedo was on a mounted patrol deep inside Ghazni Province. Suddenly, one of the vehicles hit an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). Besides the charge indicator, there are several other good reasons to choose lithium batteries over alkaline. Cost savings is another factor favoring lithium. Alkaline batteries are typically twice as inexpensive as lithium, he said. But when compared to the much longer lifespan, lithium batteries are the better choice in the long run. Carter, Pearson and Salcedo encouraged Soldiers to spread the word that lithium can make a difference on the battlefield. There could come a time, he said, when nothing else is available, but that should be the exception and not the rule. And, devices do work with alkaline, albeit with the disadvantages already cited. Salcedo then had to change out his battery pack as precious seconds ticked away. Those few seconds could have been long enough for the trigger man to escape, he said. “I’ll never know.” While others came to the assistance of the Soldiers in the vehicle, Salcedo grabbed his weapon and peered through his thermal weapon sight, scanning for the trigger man, who may have activated the IED with a wire or a remote device. After just a few seconds, his sight went black, he said. Why not just require Soldiers to use lithium? There could come a time, he said, when nothing else is available, but that should be the exception and not the rule. And, devices do work with alkaline, albeit with the disadvantages already cited. Just 10 minutes before the IED exploded, Salcedo had checked his battery indicator and it showed a 50 percent charge remaining, he said. This meant the thermal sight should be operable for at least a couple of hours more. It was 2012, and Salcedo was on a mounted patrol deep inside Ghazni Province. Suddenly, one of the vehicles hit an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). That means Soldiers don’t have to change battery packs as often. It also means that’s less weight – more than one-third less – to carry around, he said. That means Soldiers don’t have to change battery packs as often. It also means that’s less weight – more than one-third less – to carry around, he said. Incidentally, Carter said batteries used in operating environments are non-rechargeable, as recharging stations would add to the requirements. Rechargeable batteries should only be used at home stations and during training. Deconstructing what went wrong, Salcedo said he’d been using alkaline batteries. Unfortunately, the battery indicator in devices like the thermal weapon sight are calibrated for lithium batteries, so while he thought he had a couple of hours of charge left he only had a couple of minutes. WASHINGTON – Something as seemingly insignificant as a battery could change a battlefield outcome. Staff Sgt. José R. Salcedo III learned this one night in Afghanistan. Lithium advantages In good weather conditions, lithium batteries last about three times longer than alkaline, Salcedo said. In extremely hot or cold environments, lithium batteries could last up to 10 times as long. Alkaline batteries were to blame for his sight shutting down during a critical moment. Salcedo then had to change out his battery pack as precious seconds ticked away. Those few seconds could have been long enough for the trigger man to escape, he said. “I’ll never know.” Just 10 minutes before the IED exploded, Salcedo had checked his battery indicator and it showed a 50 percent charge remaining, he said. This meant the thermal sight should be operable for at least a couple of hours more. Alkaline batteries were to blame for his sight shutting down during a critical moment. What to use is at the “commander’s discretion,” he added. While others came to the assistance of the Soldiers in the vehicle, Salcedo grabbed his weapon and peered through his thermal weapon sight, scanning for the trigger man, who may have activated the IED with a wire or a remote device. After just a few seconds, his sight went black, he said. In good weather conditions, lithium batteries last about three times longer than alkaline, Salcedo said. In extremely hot or cold environments, lithium batteries could last up to 10 times as long. Joe Pearson, Logistics Management director for Project Manager Soldier Sensors and Lasers at Program Executive Office Soldier, known as PEO Soldier, added lithium batteries have been tested and shown to work in extremes from -40 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. And the more extreme the temperature, the longer the lithium batteries will work compared to the alkaline. He also explained how important it is to reduce the Soldier’s load during dismounted movement. It’s not just one-third fewer batteries, he added. Each lithium battery weighs just two-thirds that of an alkaline. With lithium batteries, he noticed a difference. Salcedo said he could get away with the indicator reading 25 percent charge remaining and “feel comfortable letting it get that low before I have to change the battery pack out.” Deconstructing what went wrong, Salcedo said he’d been using alkaline batteries. Unfortunately, the battery indicator in devices like the thermal weapon sight are calibrated for lithium batteries, so while he thought he had a couple of hours of charge left he only had a couple of minutes. Master Sgt. Reiko Carter, said the Army is reminding Soldiers to review their technical manuals. If the TM recommends using lithium, make the switch. He added that PEO Soldier is seeking to educate the force on optimal battery solutions, not make it a requirement. With lithium batteries, he noticed a difference. Salcedo said he could get away with the indicator reading 25 percent charge remaining and “feel comfortable letting it get that low before I have to change the battery pack out.” What to use is at the “commander’s discretion,” he added. Incidentally, Carter said batteries used in operating environments are non-rechargeable, as recharging stations would add to the requirements. Rechargeable batteries should only be used at home stations and during training. Pearson added that besides thermal weapon sights, there are many other devices where Soldiers should use lithium including sensors, lasers, and precision targeting devices. His office equips Soldiers with those items so they can “dominate the battlefield in all weather and visibility conditions.” last_img read more

Ditching heavy metal football and battering Bayern Munich has turned Liverpool into Champions League contenders

first_img Read More Video Settings by Metro 1 min. story PLAY Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Read More Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Klopp relishes 3-1 win to knock Bayern Munich out of Champions LeagueTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 13:02FullscreenKlopp relishes 3-1 win to knock Bayern Munich out of Champions Leaguehttps://metro.co.uk/video/klopp-relishes-3-1-win-knock-bayern-munich-champions-league-1882466/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.It was heavy metal football vs heavy metal football, a playground game masquerading as a European quarter-final. Klopp was unsurprisingly thrilled at the spectacle his current and former clubs had managed to conjure up, saying: ‘That was football at its best, a great game to experience for everyone involved.’Liverpool’s run to last season’s Champions League final had a similarly full-throttle feel to it. They topped a relatively straightforward group containing Sevilla, CSKA Moscow and Maribor, scoring 23 goals in the process before putting five past each of Porto and Manchester City followed by seven against Roma in the knockout rounds.Prior to the final in Kyiv, Liverpool had already broken the record for the number of goals scored in a single Champions League campaign with an astonishing 46 – including the six they scored against Hoffenheim in the qualifying round of the competition. In Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane and Roberto Firmino, they had three players each on 10+ goals, another record.AdvertisementAdvertisementIt was ludicrously entertaining football that embodied the style Klopp had talked up on his arrival. About Connatix V67539 Full Screen Oliver Young-MylesThursday 14 Mar 2019 1:54 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link675Shares Jurgen Klopp coined the phrase ‘heavy metal football’ before Borussia Dortmund played Arsenal in 2013 (Getty Images)That kind of style was perfectly suited to Dortmund, a club that at the time had a nucleus of exciting young talent with the legs and enthusiasm to carry out such instructions and a partisan home crowd, more than willing to roar them on. Having succeeded there, it is easy to see why Klopp was attracted to Liverpool where the conditions on and off the pitch were similar.Somewhat ironically, the most obvious example of ‘heavy metal football’ during Klopp’s opening months at Anfield, came during a Europa League game against Dortmund. Then managed by Thomas Tuchel, Dortmund were slowly moving away from their former manager’s style towards a more possession-based approach, but Julian Weigl aside it was a squad that had been assembled by Klopp.Dortmund flew out of the traps, racing into a 2-0 lead within nine minutes thanks to future Arsenal teammates Henrikh Mkhitaryan and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang. Divock Origi pulled one back before Marco Reus quickly restored Dortmund’s two-goal advantage. Liverpool needed three goals to progress and they duly came inside the final 25 minutes through Philippe Coutinho, Mamadou Sakho and Dejan Lovren. Read More Sadio Mane and Virgil Van Dijk were on target as Liverpool beat Bayern Munich (Getty Images)Having conceded six over two legs against Roma last term, Liverpool restricted a side containing Robert Lewandowski, James Rodriguez and Franck Ribery to just one and even that was scored by a Liverpool player – Joel Matip turning a cross into his own net. It was a performance that was the polar opposite of that helter-skelter meeting with Dortmund early on in Klopp’s reign.AdvertisementRather than relentlessly pressing Bayern high up the pitch, Liverpool were happy to sit off them in the opening stages with Bayern enjoying 63% possession and completing 340 passes to their visitors’ 194 in the opening 45 minutes. Despite having more of the ball, though, Bayern barely looked like troubling Liverpool’s backline with the midfield shuffling dutifully across to plug any gaps that emerged.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityMane’s opening goal – a wonderful solo effort that left Manuel Neuer seeing stars – gave Liverpool the boon of an away goal and although Bayern managed to find a route back into the game, Liverpool regrouped after the break and delivered a masterful counter-attacking display in the second half.Again, Bayern edged possession, but their use of the ball compared to Liverpool’s was sterile. For their 52% of the ball, Bayern failed to muster a single shot on target, while Liverpool had four. They picked their moments expertly, first capitalising on Bayern’s weakness at set-pieces through Van Dijk and then catching them cold late on when Salah’s brilliant ball was nodded in by Mane.Liverpool have enjoyed some memorable European nights under Klopp reaching two finals in three years, but this was by far the most complete performance they have put together in the Champions League during his time in charge. Top articles Ditching heavy metal football and battering Bayern Munich has turned Liverpool into Champions League contenders Coming Next Jurgen Klopp celebrating with the Liverpool supporters after the win over Bayen Munich at the Allianz Arena (Getty Images)When Jurgen Klopp was appointed Liverpool manager back in October 2015, editors across the land were falling over themselves in a bid to shoehorn the words ‘heavy’ ‘metal’ and ‘football’ into their headlines.It was Klopp himself who coined the phrase ‘heavy metal football’ during his time with previous club Borussia Dortmund prior to a Champions League game against Arsenal in November 2013 and it was a soundbite subsequently lapped up by the British media.Discussing the differences between his and Arsene Wenger’s footballing philosophies, Klopp quipped: ‘He likes having the ball, playing football, passes … it’s like an orchestra. But it’s a silent song. I like heavy metal.’AdvertisementAdvertisementHe reiterated his footballing preferences in his very first interview after joining Liverpool, saying: ‘My teams must play at full throttle and take it to the limit every single game.’ADVERTISEMENT 1/1 Skip Comment SPONSORED Read More Skip Ad Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Liverpool’s 7-6 aggregate win over Roma encapsulated their top-heavy approach (Getty Images)Nevertheless, there was a sense throughout their exhilarating Champions League run that for all the quality of their attacking play, Liverpool were a touch too top-heavy, as emphasised during their semi-final meeting with Roma.Liverpool were dominant for all but perhaps15 of the 180 minutes, yet only ended up winning it 7-6 on aggregate, itself a ridiculous scoreline at such a stage in the Champions League. Both at home and away, Liverpool invited Roma onto them in the final ten minutes and on each occasion, Roma scored twice. Even when Liverpool seemed in control they had the capacity to fall apart.The same was true in the final when Liverpool were defeated 3-1 by Real Madrid in what was, for the most part, an even contest.Liverpool’s desire to play fast-paced, attacking football at times left them short at the other end of the pitch and their style has been noticeably reigned in a touch throughout the current campaign with a far better balance struck between attack and defence.That has been obvious during a Premier League campaign in which Liverpool have only conceded 17 goals in 30 games and kept 17 clean sheets in total and it was in evidence again in the Champions League last-16 second leg against Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday.A 0-0 draw at Anfield in the first leg left the tie in the balance but Liverpool rarely looked troubled during the return in Munich, as a double from Sadio Mane and a thumping header from Virgil van Dijk handed them a 3-1 victory on the night and on aggregate overall. Advertisement Advertisement Klopp celebrating Mane’s second goal with his substitute (Getty Images)It was made abundantly clear during both legs that Bayern are a faded force, yet still, Liverpool dealt with them authoritatively and deserve credit for denying them a quarter-final place for the first time in eight years. No team will fancy meeting Liverpool in the quarters.AdvertisementBefore the game, Klopp responded irritably to pundits suggesting that Liverpool should lose to Bayern on purpose so as to free up space in their schedule and focus on the Premier League, the suggestion being that they don’t have sufficient depth to compete for both.Liverpool proceeded to make a mockery of that school of thought with an excellent all-round display. It might not be heavy metal football that Klopp promised but this slightly more orchestral style has better-equipped Liverpool to challenge for major honours.More: SchoolMum finds girl, 6, rubbing talcum powder on her face to make herself whiteParents vow to homeschool son after headteacher bans face masks in classTrans boy, 17, waiting two and a half years to get an appointment at gender clinic Heavy metal or full throttle, the idea was that Klopp would implement a fast-paced style at Liverpool based around the high pressing of spaces (Gegenpressing), quick transitions and creating overloads in attack. Essentially, it was pressing an opponent as soon as a ball was lost, winning it back and then immediately flying forward in numbers. Read More / last_img read more

A Quick Spring Wrap-Up

first_imgWe are nearing the state series time for spring sports.  Here are some of the things I have observed in the area so far.Batesville and Oldenburg Academy tennis are again on a collision course to see which team will represent our area in  regional tennis.  Christian Lamppert of BHS was this year’s Ripley County Golf Champion.  Alex Roell pitched a no-hitter for the BHS baseball team in late April.Some of the people in the area making news in track and field are Garrett Wagner of BHS in the hurdle races, Curtis Eckstein of OA in the distance races, and Robert Stroebel of BHS has set a new pole vault record for the Bulldogs.  The East Central girls track team seems to be the class of the area but the boys teams are still too close to make any predictions.In the other team sports no one has made a complete statement of dominance.  Good luck to all teams and individuals as they get ready for the sectionals and beyond.last_img read more